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Church of England's report on marriage and sexuality suffers setback at Synod

Church of England's report on marriage and sexuality suffers setback at Synod

ACNS
February 15, 2017

A report from the House of Bishops about marriage and same sex relationships has received a significant setback in a vote at the General Synod in London. It is an embarrassing symbolic rejection of the Bishops' report which had stated that there should be no change in the church's teaching while calling for a "fresh tone" on the issues. Speaking before the vote, the Archbishop of Canterbury said he believed passionately that the report that had been worked on and struggled with was a roadmap and he promised the church would find a new "inclusion."

However many speakers in the debate said the report was not clear enough or did not go far enough. After the debate, a "Take Note" vote was held; it's a neutral motion which allows Synod to discuss the content and recommendations of a report without committing the Synod to the formal acceptance of it. However the vote to "take note" was lost, because it needed a majority in all three Houses of the Synod -- the Bishops, the Clergy and the Laity and it was defeated in the House of Clergy, which voted NOT to take note by 100 votes to 93.

Responding to the vote, the Rt Revd Graham Jones, the Bishop of Norwich said: "I can guarantee that the House of Bishops will consider carefully and prayerfully all the contributions made in the debate today...there is no simple and easy answer to this issue beyond committing ourselves to engagement with each other when the views on what we should do are profoundly contested."

Earlier, Bishop James had acknowledged "significant differences of opinion within the House of Bishops about same sex relationships" and that the report had not received a "rapturous" reception in all quarters; he expressed regret for any "pain or anger it may have caused." He noted the "tension which can exist between our determination to uphold firmly the teaching on marriage and sexual relationships as currently expressed in our Canons, and the commitment to affirm the place of LGBTI people within the church..... to enable their voices to be heard."

During the debate a number of speakers had called for greater clarity. "Same old, same old" said one speaker. "Deeply flawed" said another and "there's a need for a radical welcome for all." One gay speaker said people wanted the church to go forward faster and called on the Bishops to think again -- her words were warmly applauded. The Dean of Southwark, the Revd Andrew Nunn, said to the Bishops: "You talk of a new tone -- but I don't like the tone: you can do a lot better. Bishops can we not have a bit of pride in our LGBT members and more recognition of the blessing that gay people bring to our churches?" Again, loud and prolonged applause. However some evangelical members of Synod also expressed concern, fearing that the Bishops' report was a softening of the guidelines on sexual morality.

Responding to all of the comments Archbishop Justin said the Bishops would go on thinking : "we could hardly fail to do so in light of what has been said in the debate."

Earlier in the day Bishop James had charted the recent history of the Church of England on issues of sexuality, saying he had been discussing same sex relationships for over forty years of ordained ministry. He addressed the difficulty of the issues; "I would be misleading you if I did not confess to being conflicted in presenting this report but in that I think I am far from alone among the bishops and in the wider Church of England.....our own history in dealing with these matters also explains why people on all sides of the debate rarely find themselves satisfied." He said on one level nothing much seemed to have changed since he made a presentation on the issue of homosexual relationships in the 1970s but on another level "everything seems to have changed, especially in the wider culture."

The Bishop of Willesden, the Right Reverend Pete Broadbent, said this debate would be "a continuing source of disagreement because we haven't coalesced around an end point. When we legislated for women to be bishops, even those opposed came to the view that the Church of England had to make it possible for women to be bishops in the Church of God according to our canons and formularies. In this debate we haven't even begun to find a place where we can coalesce. The Bishops' Report acknowledges a place of starting. More conversation is needed."

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Church of England in turmoil as synod rejects report on same sex relationships
Clergy vote against report by 100 to 93 in blow to archbishop of Canterbury as he tries to chart course between apparently unreconcilable wings of church

By Harriet Sherwood Religion correspondent
https://www.theguardian.com/
February 15, 2017

The Church of England has been plunged into fresh turmoil after its general assembly threw out a report on same sex relationships in a rebuff to bishops following almost three years of intense internal discussion and intractable divisions.

The C of E's synod, meeting in London this week, voted on Thursday to effectively reject the report, which upholds traditional teaching that marriage is a lifelong union of a man and a woman.

Although there was a clear overall majority in favour of "taking note" of the report, it needed the support of all three houses -- bishops, clergy and laity. The clergy narrowly voted against, by 100 votes to 93, meaning the motion was lost.

The de facto rejection of the report is a blow to the authority of Justin Welby, the archbishop of Canterbury, who pleaded with the synod to accept the report as "a basis for moving on, a good basis, a roadmap".

Welby presides over the House of Bishops, which has met four times since internal discussion groups wound up last July to chart the way forward between two apparently unreconcilable wings of the church.

Responding to the vote, Graham James, bishop of Norwich, said: "I can guarantee that the House of Bishops will consider carefully and prayerfully all the contributions made in the debate today."

He added: "We have listened to those who have spoken, and those others who have made contributions to us directly. Our ongoing discussions will be informed by what members of synod and the wider church have said as a result of this report."

Acknowledging that the next steps were unclear, Pete Broadbent, bishop of Willesden, said: "In this debate, we haven't even begun to find a place where we can coalesce.... More conversation is needed. We don't yet know the next stage -- nor yet when and whether we can bring any further report to synod."

The issue has dominated the current four-day session of the synod, and has been the subject of bitter debate within the C of E -- and the global Anglican communion -- for decades. At the moment, gay clergy are forbidden from marrying or having sexual relationships, and same sex marriage services are prohibited in churches.

In a debate lasting more than two hours, about one in three members of the synod requested to speak from the packed floor of the auditorium. Many contributions included personal testimonies from lesbians and gay men.

Jayne Ozanne of Oxford accused the bishops of putting "political expediency ahead of principle". Fearing a split, they had "chosen not to lead but to manage".

Simon Butler of Southwark, an openly gay member of synod, said that "only when fracture comes can new possibilities emerge", and quoted Genesis: "I will not let you go until you bless me."

Lucy Gorman of York told the synod that "outside these walls, we are being heard as lacking in love". No wonder, she added, that fewer young people were coming to church. "Why would people become part of a church that is seemingly homophobic?"

But those on the conservative wing of the church also expressed criticisms and some voted against the report. Andrea Minichiello-Williams of Chichester said: "All sexual expression outside a lifelong permanent union on one man and one woman is sinful." Sexuality was a "first order issue", one on which salvation depends. "That's why it's so important to speak clearly with regard to sexual sin."

Paul Bayes, bishop of Liverpool, said: "I honour the anger and, indeed, fury, of the LGBTI community who see in this report hard stones when they looked for bread." However, he urged the synod to back the report, saying its encouragement for clergy to exercise maximum freedom within existing doctrine "may carry us to places we have not previously gone". The report, he said, "cannot, will not and should not mark the end of the road" on the issue.

Welby, the final speaker to be called, said "how we deal with profound disagreement... is the challenge we face". The church needed to be "neither careless in our theology nor ignorant of the world around us", he added.

Before the debate, both James and Broadbent, who led the bishops' group which wrote the report, apologised to its critics. "It has not received a rapturous reception in all quarters, and I regret any pain or anger it may have caused. And if we've got the tone wrong, we are very sorry," said James.

Broadbent acknowledged it was "a pretty conservative document", adding: "I do want to apologise to those members of synod who found our report difficult, who didn't recognise themselves in it, who had expected more from us than we actually delivered, for the tone of the report. On behalf of the House [of Bishops], and without being trite or trivial, I'm sorry."

While upholding traditional doctrine on marriage, the report said teaching should be interpreted with "maximum freedom" for same sex couples and called for a "fresh tone and culture of welcome and support" for lesbians and gays while proposing no concrete change.

Following the vote, Ozanne, a leading gay rights campaigner on the synod, said: "I am thrilled that this report has been voted down. We now look forward to working together to build a church that is broad enough to accept the diversity of views that exist within it, courageous enough to address the deep divisions that exist between us and loving enough to accept each other as equal members of the body of Christ."

Simon Sarmiento, chairman of LGBTI Mission, said: "I'm pleased the report was not accepted. I am sure the bishops will have learned a lesson from this experience which I know has been painful. I hope they will now consult widely and proceed wisely."

Andrea Williams, from the conservative Christian Concern, said the report had tried "to straddle positions that cannot be reconciled". She added: "This shouldn't be read as a victory for the LGBT activists within the Church. The reason why this happened was because there was no clarity in which direction the church will go."

LGBTI Christians and supporters of gay equality held a vigil outside Church House in Westminster, the venue for the synod, during the debate.

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